What I read

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As a historian, I like to look back, and now is the season of “My Year” reviews. You can let Spotify tell you which songs you listened most to (in my case, I’ve used the app so little outside the gym, I wonder if I should discontinue my subscription), you can see on Instagram which photos were most liked. You can track your time or expenses and review 2018 in that way. I decided, this year, to look back at the books I read.

A convinced me to register at Goodreads last year. At that point, I didn’t really see the point of telling an app what I read. But now I am hooked! It’s a social network so you can see what your friends are reading, you can update your progress (motivational!), by your ratings the algorithm recommends new books for you, and when my mother asks me if I have a good book suggestion, I just look at my Goodreads, and say, “Oh, yes, Americanah!”

I really think Goodreads has spurred my reading. (The fact that I through my Kindle and my amazing friend Emily have access to the Los Angeles Public Library has helped a lot, too.) The automatic Goodreads year review confirms this: I read almost 9,000 pages this year! The longest book was “American Wife” and let me tell you, I savored every minute of it. The most popular one, among other reads, was Eleanor & Park, which I thought was mediocre at most, and pointless in a way. The least popular was Elizabeth II’s biography. Such a great book! I assume it’s “not popular” because it’s German and Goodreads is used by mostly Anglophones.

I read 28 books (and abandoned 10, including some I thought would capture my attention, like “The Buried Giant”, “My brilliant friend”, “The Art of Fielding” and “Main Street”). If anyone is looking for recommendations, these were my favorites:

What Alice forgot, by Liane Moriarty: I realize this is a chickflick, but basic concept of a 40-something-woman losing the last ten years of her memory, is original and the writing is compelling, potentially – maybe depending on your own life situation – leading to deeper thoughts. I read this, almost 500 pages, in a few days on a trip to Luxembourg.

Americanah, by Chimamanda Ngozi Adiche: There’s a reason this book is hyped. Everything about this book is awesome, except the end (but that’s okay). Reading “Americanah” opened up my mind to the fact that the world is not just Europe or America.

Crazy Rich Asians, by Kevin Kwan: This book also follows the “ehm, I am so ignorant to non-Europe” pattern. It’s downright elating to expand one’s knowledge of other cultures – and don’t worry, this book is so popcultural and easy to digest, you will enjoy reading it. Then, you have to go see the movie which came out 2018 – good fun!

Sisterland, American Wife and Eligible, by Curtis Sittenfeld: Yes, I went on a Sittenfeld spree. I knew I liked her, but now I know I am a fan. All three books (the only ones available I hadn’t read yet and I read them straight after another) were good. “Eligible” is a modern version of “Pride and Prejudice”, “Sisterland” is a supernatural tale about twins, and “American Wife” is a novel of Laura Bush’s life. It’s so well-written that you start feeling empathy for Republicans.

Jag heter inte Miriam (My name is not Miriam), by Majgull Axelsson: One of the, actually few, Swedish books I’ve read this year (Kindle, L.A., see above). The story is about a Roma woman who survived the concentration camps and came to Sweden, pretending her entire life to be Jewish because Roma were deported in Sweden even in the post-1945-era. A touching book that taught me some facts I didn’t know (e.g. I wasn’t fully aware of how extreme Dr. Mengele’s sadistic experiments were).

Es gibt Dinge, die kann man nicht erz├Ąhlen,┬á(Some things cannot be told) by Kirsten Boie: This author is the German Astrid Lindgren and anyone who says elsewise doesn’t know anything. For many years, I’ve been a devoted Boie reader. This story collection about children in Africa, that Boie personally knows, made me cry.

One book that had an exciting basic idea (eight scientists living under glass for two years as an experiment – this really happened and Steve Bannon was part of it!), but couldn’t make it on the recommendation list, was The Terranauts by T.C. Boyle. I consciously hadn’t read a Boyle in literally 12 years and once again my verdict is: good start and then he just rambles for 250 pages too long. And the award for worst book I’ve read this year goes to Bill Clinton’s “The President is missing”. I don’t even know why I finished it. Sorry, Bill!

Now there are 19 days left in this year. My plan is to finish the two books I am currently reading: Ian McEwan, Nutshell (a murder case told from the perspective of an unborn baby – super weird but now I want to know how it ends) and Elizabeth Strout, Anything is possible (tales from the small town never have been this interesting).

A good book is like a garden carried in the pocket.

(Persian proverb)

Unfortunately, amazon doesn’t pay me anything for posting links to their website, but I am thinking it’s the easiest way for you to find out more about the books.

 

 

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